Sanctions

04.02.2019. 16:07

Sanctions are restrictive measures, namely, restrictions or prohibitions imposed pursuant to international public law.

Sanctions are imposed by an international organisation or a state and applicable against legal or natural persons or other identifiable subjects (hereafter – a subject of sanctions).

Sanctions seek to restore peace and security in a region or prevent threat to international peace and security, and to bring about a change in the conduct of a state so as to ensure or restore peace, security and the rule of law in the state targeted by sanctions, or in relation to the above mentioned other subjects, or a region as a whole. Consequently, the aim of sanctions is not to punish but to prevent a possible deterioration of the situation.

Types of sanctions:

  1. financial restrictions – restrictions in respect of financial instruments and financial resources belonging to, owned, held or controlled by the a subject of international public law, a natural or legal person, or another identifiable subject (hereinafter – subject of sanctions);
  2. civil restrictions – restrictions in respect of all types of transactions with other economic resources if these transactions result in change of the owner, or the purpose of these transactions is to make available cash funds or other type of economic resources for the subject of sanctions;
  3. restrictions on admission – the subject of sanctions is prohibited from entering and residing in Latvia or crossing the territory of Latvia in transit;
  4. restrictions on movement of strategic and other goods – prohibition to sell, supply, transfer, export strategic goods or other goods specified in legislation to the subject of sanctions, or otherwise alienate those goods, or allow access to them;
  5. restrictions on provision of tourism services – prohibition to offer tourism services for travel to specific areas.

At the same time, certain restrictions can be imposed on provision of services related to a type of sanctions (for instance, a ban on services related to arms, or to equipment and software for monitoring internet and telephone communications etc.)

Who has the right to adopt sanctions?

  • the United Nations Security Council (UNSC), pursuant to Chapter VII of the UN Charter;
  • the European Union;
  • other international organisations too, for instance, the Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE);
  • individual states.

Sanction lists and information on sanctions:

  • All UN, EU, Latvian national and US sanctions are listed here. Information on the website is updated on a daily basis.
  • UN sanctions

A consolidated list of sanctions adopted by the United Nations Security Council is accessible here.

Information on sanction regimes established by the UNSC and resolutions on those regimes are accessible here.

The legal basis for the UNSC sanctions is Chapter VII of the UN Charter.

Latvia introduces the UN-adopted sanctions via EU legislation; however, when required, the Cabinet may issue regulations implementing the sanctions adopted by the UN, should the EU delay doing so.

EU sanctions

A Consolidated List of EU sanctions (financial restrictions) is accessible here:

The Consolidated List is an advisory aid and a search tool, with only the publications of legal acts in the EU Official Journal being legally binding. http://eur-lex.europa.eu/homepage.html?locale=lv

As all the sanctions adopted by the UN are transposed into EU law, the Consolidated List includes financial restrictions set by both the EU and the UN that are binding throughout the entire EU jurisdiction.

In addition, the EU can also supplement UN sanctions (for instance, in the case of Iran), and it can introduce unilateral sanctions (for instance, in the case of Belarus, Syria, and Ukraine).

The legal basis for EU sanctions is Article 29 of the Treaty on European Union and Article 215 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union.

The EU Sanctions Map offers a centralised system of recording sanctions and presenting the EU and UN sanctions regimes in a detailed and comprehensive manner as an easy way for companies and private individuals to obtain information they need. The Sanctions Map specifies concrete types of sanction; it contains direct links to legislation or resolutions whereby a specific sanction has been adopted, as well as providing a comprehensive search tool and detailed explanations, for instance, which goods are subject to an embargo. The Sanctions Map is maintained and updated by the European Commission.

Institutions responsible for the introduction of sanctions in Latvia:

The Ministry of Foreign Affairs is the coordinating institution in all sanction-related matters in Latvia. The Ministry of Foreign Affairs coordinates the circulation of information with international organisations and competent authorities abroad on the imposition and introduction of sanctions and on the application of exemptions in Latvia.

The MFA is also responsible for measures of control over export of strategic goods (arms embargo), namely, each transaction with strategic goods – military and dual use – requires a licence issues by the Committee for Control of Goods of Strategic Significance. The licence is not issued if the respective recipient country is subject to an arms embargo.

Other competent institutions:

When imposing national sanctions, the Cabinet may also designate other competent authorities besides those indicated above.

Legal framework:

The introduction of sanctions is also regulated by other laws and regulations in the field of customs, immigration and the movement of strategic goods, by the Civil Procedure Law, and others.

Imposition of national sanctions:

Pursuant to Section 3 of the Law On International Sanctions and National Sanctions of the Republic of Latvia, the Cabinet may impose national sanctions upon its own initiative or on the basis of a proposal from the Minister for Foreign Affairs or a recommendation from the National Security Council.

Liability for the violation of sanctions:

All natural and legal persons are under an obligation to respect and execute international and national sanctions.

Penalty for the violation of sanctions imposed by international organisations – a maximum custodial sentence of 8 years – is determined pursuant to Section 84 of the Criminal Law.

Guidelines for the interpretation of sanctions:

  1. EU Best Practices for the effective implementation of restrictive measures http://data.consilium.europa.eu/doc/document/ST-7383-2015-REV-1/en/pdf
  2. Guidelines on implementation and evaluation of restrictive measures (sanctions) in the framework of the EU Common Foreign and Security Policy http://register.consilium.europa.eu/doc/srv?l=EN&f=ST%2011205%202012%20INIT
  3. New elements on the notions of ownership and control and the making available of funds or economic resources http://register.consilium.europa.eu/doc/srv?l=EN&f=ST%209068%202013%20INIT

Sanctions in Brief

Sanctions are restrictions or prohibitions imposed by states or international organisations.

On whom can sanctions be imposed, or who is subject to sanctions?

  1. states or territories,
  2. legal persons,
  3. natural persons,
  4. other identifiable entities.

Types of sanctions:

  1. financial restrictions – it is prohibited to transfer financial resources to subjects of sanctions;
  2. civil restrictions – it is prohibited to enter into transactions with subjects of sanctions; subjects of sanctions are restricted in their rights to deal with their assets;
  3. restrictions on admission – the subject of sanctions is prohibited from entering and residing in Latvia or crossing the territory of Latvia in transit;
  4. restrictions on circulation of strategic and other goods – it is prohibited to alienate certain strategic goods or dual use goods to subjects of sanctions, or allow their access to those goods;
  5. restrictions on provision of tourism services – it is prohibited to offer tourism services for travel to specific areas.

Sanctions can be imposed by:

  • the United Nations;
  • the European Union;
  • other international organisations, e.g., the Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe;
  • individual states.

Sanctions imposed by the United Nations, the European Union and the Cabinet are binding upon Latvia.

Where to find information on sanctions?

  • All UN, EU, US sanctions and Latvian national sanctions are listed here. Information on the website is updated on a daily basis.
    UN sanctions are also accessible here

A list of EU sanctions is accessible here.

Lists of US sanctions are also accessible here.

Sanctions imposed by Latvia are also accessible here.

  • Interactive “Sanctions Map”
    “Sanctions Map” offers latest information on sanctions imposed by the EU and the UN. The map is accessible here

Information materials:

What Businesses Should Know About Sanctions? (in Latvian)

Sanctions in Public Procurement (in Latvian)

Foreign Ministry Newsletter October 2018 on Sanction Updates (in Latvian)

Legal framework for sanctions:

Law On International Sanctions and National Sanctions of the Republic of Latvia

Law On International Sanctions and National Sanctions of the Republic of Latvia (hereafter – the Sanctions Law) governs the imposition and execution of international and national sanctions in Latvia.

The purpose of the Sanctions Law is to ensure peace, security, and rule of law in accordance with the international obligations and national interests of Latvia through introducing international sanctions or imposing national sanctions or, in the cases laid down by this Law, applying sanctions imposed by a member state of the European Union or the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation.

The Sanctions Law applies to all natural and legal persons, and they are under an obligation to comply with and execute international and national sanctions.

The Sanctions Law was adopted on 4 February 2016 and came into force on 1 March 2016, replacing the Law “On the Introduction of Sanctions Imposed by International Organisations in the Republic of Latvia” (in Latvian) of 5 October 2006.

On 21 June 2018, the Saeima adopted a law entitled “Amendments to the Law on International Sanctions and National Sanctions of the Republic of Latvia”, which came into force on 12 July 2018.

Most significant amendments:

  1. The Sanctions Law clearly states that all natural and legal persons are under an obligation to comply with and execute sanctions that are in force in Latvia. This consolidates an essential principle in the functioning of the Latvian legal system – the duty of each person to prevent the violation of sanctions.
  2. National sanctions imposed by the Cabinet take effect immediately – on the date of signing the Cabinet Order. This follows the principle that sanctions should take effect immediately, without notifying the subject of sanctions of the adoption thereof in order to prevent the sanctions subject from avoiding enforcement. It is also envisaged that such a Cabinet order is published in the official journal Latvijas Vēstnesis on the next working day after the signing.
  3. The Law also adds the State Revenues Service (SRS) and the Consumer Rights Protection Centre (CRPC) to the list of competent institutions, stipulating that the said institutions are in charge of control over financial restrictions and restrictions under civil law concerning persons under their supervision as listed in the draft law.
  4. Under the Law, the persons supervised by the Financial and Capital Market Commission FCMC), the SRS and the CRPS are obliged to carry out, in accordance with the character of their activity, the risk assessment concerning sanctions and establish an internal control system. The obligation to set up an internal control system on sanctions matters will take effect on 1 May 2019 thereby giving time to the supervised persons to make the necessary preparations.
  5. The Law gives a definition of the internal control system, lays down the right of supervisory institutions to apply administrative sanctions and supervisory measures due to deficiencies in internal control systems, and the right of the supervised institutions to appeal against those decisions. The draft law also provides for a limitation period of ten years applicable to administrative penalties and supervisory measures. The provisions concerning the right of supervisory institutions to apply administrative sanctions and supervisory measures will come into force upon amendments to Section 84 of the Criminal Law, clearly separating between criminal and administrative liability for the violation of regulations governing sanctions.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               The FCMC is authorised to issue binding regulations on specific requirements for the establishment of an internal control system, while the SRS and the CRPS are to produce publicly available guidelines.
  6. The Law also regulates the application of sanctions in the field of public procurement, imposing an obligation to check whether candidates or tenderers have been targeted by any sanctions, as well as an obligation to provide for in public procurement contracts the right to unilaterally withdraw from the contract, should its implementation be impeded by sanctions imposed during the contract period. This provision will not apply to procurements or procurement procedures launched or announced before the provision takes effect, namely, by 12 July 2018. 

Sanctions Lists

  • All UN, EU and US sanctions and Latvian national sanctions are listed here. The website information is updated on a daily basis.
  • UN Sanctions

Information material:

What Businesses Should Know About Sanctions?

Sanctions in Public Procurement

Foreign Ministry Newsletter October 2018 on Sanction Updates

A consolidated list of sanctions adopted by the United Nations Security Council is accessible here.

  • EU Sanctions

A Consolidated List of EU sanctions (financial restrictions) is accessible here.

Consolidated versions of the list of sanctions adopted by the European Union are accessible here.

Go to the website and create an EU Login account to access the sanctions lists.

The Consolidated List is an advisory aid and a search tool, with only the publications of legal acts in the EU Official Journal being legally binding. http://eur-lex.europa.eu/homepage.html?locale=lv

  • US Sanctions

Lists of sanctions adopted by the US OFAC (Office for Foreign Assets Control) are accessible here.

To look up the US OFAC sanctions, choose a sanction regime or fill out a search criterion field for a designated individual.

The “Sanctions Map” offers up-to-date information on sanctions imposed by the EU and the UN. The map is accessible here.

The “Sanctions Map” is maintained and updated by the European Commission.

The sanctions map specifies concrete types of sanctions, contains direct links to legislation or resolutions whereby a specific sanction has been adopted, and provides a comprehensive search mechanism and detailed explanations, for instance, which goods are subject to an embargo.

National Sanctions Imposed by the Republic of Latvia

Pursuant to the Law On International Sanctions and National Sanctions of the Republic of Latvia, the Cabinet may impose national sanctions upon its initiative and on the basis of a proposal of the Minister for Foreign Affairs or a recommendation of the National Security Council.

National sanctions imposed by the Cabinet:

Cabinet Regulation No. 419 of 25 July 2017 “Regulations on the imposition of national sanctions of the Republic of Latvia in respect of subjects related to the nuclear programme and the political regime of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea” came into force on 1 August 2017.

The Regulation imposes national sanctions in order to prevent damage to the foreign policy interests and national security of Latvia and to combat international terrorism or manufacture, storage, movement, use, or proliferation of weapons of mass destruction related to the nuclear programme and political regime of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea

Cabinet Order No. 390 of 31 July 2017 “On the imposition of financial restrictions of the Republic of Latvia in respect of subjects related to the nuclear programme and the political regime of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea” came into force on 1 August 2017.

The order sets financial restriction on a Thai passport holder, TSAI Hsein Tai, a.k.a. Alex Tsai H.T. (born 8 August 1945).

Cabinet Order No. 137 of 29 March 2018 “On the imposition of financial restrictions in respect of subjects related to the nuclear programme and the political regime of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea” came into force on 29 March 2018.

The order sets financial restriction on a citizen of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Ri Song-Hyok, a.k.a. LI, Cheng He (B. 19 March 1965) and a company Ruskor International Company Ltd., which is operating for the benefit of the government of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea and the ultimate beneficial owner of which is Ri Song-Hyuok.

Under Section 5 of the Law On International Sanctions and National Sanctions of the Republic of Latvia, if financial restrictions have been imposed in relation to a subject of sanctions, participants of the financial and capital market of Latvia have a duty to take the following action:

  1. to freeze all financial resources and financial instruments which are in the ownership, possession or under control of the subject of sanctions;
  2. to deny access for the subject of sanctions to financial resources and financial instruments;
  3. not to provide the financial services specified in international or national sanctions to the subject of sanctions.

Public Procurement and Sanctions

Section 11.1 of the Law On International Sanctions and National Sanctions of the Republic of Latvia provides for the application of sanctions in public procurement and a public-private partnership.

Given that national and international sanctions as well as national sanctions by member states of the EU or NATO, for instance, the OFAC, can influence contracting entities, providers of public services, public partners or their representatives, the Sanctions Law provides for a possibility to refuse signing a contract with certain suppliers where the implementation of a contract signed with them could be impeded due to the sanctions imposed.

These provisions took effect through amendments to the Sanctions Law on 12 July 2018 and apply to all laws governing the procurement sector: the Public Procurement Law, the Public Service Providers Procurement Law, the Defence and Security Sector Procurement Law, and the Law on Public-Private Partnership.

The provisions apply both to the sanctions targeting a candidate or a tenderer as a legal entity, to their representatives, to members of a partnership, where a partnership is a candidate or a tenderer, as well as subcontractors and persons invited to meet qualification requirements.

Candidates or tenderers as well as subcontractors indicated by them or persons invited to meet qualification requirements shall be excluded from the procedure for the award of the contract or replaced, where the sanction imposed could directly impede the execution of the contract. The exclusions do not apply where the character of the sanction and the targeted person are in no way connected with the execution of the contract in question.

To preventively address the situation when no sanction has been set during the procedure for the award of the contract but it is imposed after the signing of the contract, the contract should provide for the right of the contracting entity, the provider of public services, the public partner or its representative to withdraw from the contract unilaterally, should the execution of the said contract become impossible due to the sanctions imposed.

The Procurement Monitoring Bureau infosheet on the application of sanctions in public procurement

FAQ on the application of sanctions in public procurement

Discussion "Application of the Law On International Sanctions and National Sanctions of the Republic of Latvia in organising public procurement by local authorities" (a video in Latvian)

Designated individuals can be found on the following websites:

The website of the Office for Prevention of Laundering of Proceeds Derived from Criminal Activity (FIU Latvia): sankcijas.kd.gov.lv

The FIU Latvia search tool offers access to UN, EU, OFAC and Latvian national sanctions via a single page.

Information on the website is updated on a daily basis.

  1. The European Union Sanctions Map provides a visual overview of sanctions adopted by the UN and the EU.
  2. A consolidated version of UN sanction lists is accessible here: https://www.un.org/sc/suborg/en/sanctions/un-sc-consolidated-list
  3. Consolidated versions of the European Union sanction lists are accessible here: https://webgate.ec.europa.eu/europeaid/fsd/fsf  An EU Login account needs to be created to access the sanction lists. It can be done here

4. Sanctions lists by the US OFAC are accessible here.

US OFAC sanctions

OFAC sanctions

Although sanctions imposed by the US OFAC (Office for Foreign Assets Control) are not legally binding upon Latvia, Latvian banks have committed themselves to observing OFAC sanctions, thereby seeking to bolster the reputations of Latvia’s financial sector and facilitate cooperation with partners in the US.

In certain cases it is possible to apply to OFAC for a licence to engage in a transaction that otherwise would be prohibited; however, the procedure is time- and resource-consuming (a lawyer to be hired, etc.). In view of this, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs calls on businesses to be aware of the need for risk assessment when considering deals with persons targeted by US sanctions.

Compliance with the OFAC sanctions is of vital importance for financial institutions to be able to operate in the US market. The law passed by the Saeima on 21 June 2018, “Amendments to the Law On International Sanctions and the National Sanctions of the Republic of Latvia” (effective of 12 July 2018), stipulates the cases when sanctions imposed by a member state of the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation, i.e., OFAC sanctions, should be taken into account.

Compliance with OFAC sanctions is in the interests of financial institutions, businesses and public persons when they open a call for tender. Non-compliance can result in access being denied to transactions in USD and to deals and transactions being suspended, thereby preventing the needed payments, which can damage the reputation of both a company, a bank and the country and lead to other negative consequences.

Amendments to the Sanctions Law

Amendments to the Law On International Sanctions and National Sanctions of the Republic of Latvia reflect the present reality of US sanctions also having impact on Latvia and draw attention to those sanctions as well as laying down safeguard mechanisms against the adverse impact of US sanctions on the execution of contracts.

Following the amendments, in public procurement and public and private partnership, the following persons shall be subject to checks on OFAC sanctions:

  • candidates or tenderers;
  • a sub-contractor specified by a candidate or a tenderer, the value of works to be performed or services to be provided by which is at least 10 percent of the total contract price;
  • a person on whose abilities the candidate or the tenderer relies upon in order to certify that the qualification thereof meets the requirements prescribed by the contract notice, procurement procedure documents, the concession notice or concession procedure documents.
  • a member of the candidate’s or the tenderer’s board or council;
  • an authorised representative or a procurator, or a person authorised to represent the candidate or the tenderer in activities related to a branch, or a member of a partnership, if the candidate or the tenderer is a partnership.
    Where the checks reveal that the candidate or the tenderer are targeted by OFAC sanctions influencing vital interests of the financial and capital market that interfere with the execution of the contract, the candidate or the tenderer can be excluded from the contract award procedure.

“Vital interests of the financial and capital market”: if a violation of sanctions has impact on the interests of other important operators in the financial and capital market.

Pursuant to the amendments to the Sanctions Law, the Financial and Capital Market Commission is tasked with the following:

  • to set criteria enabling operators in the financial and capital market to determine whether sanctions imposed by a Member State of the European Union or the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation will substantially influence the interests of operators in the financial and capital market or the interests of the financial and capital market;
  • to set requirements for operators in the financial and capital market concerning the application of financial restrictions, where those restrictions stem from sanctions imposed by a Member State of the European Union or the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation the compliance with which substantially influence the interests of operators in the financial and capital market or the interests of the financial and capital market.

OFAC sanction lists:

For an easier update on US OFAC sanctions, follow OFAC Recent Actions Notices.

The lists of US OFAC sanctions are accessible here.

Information material:

Guidelines to banks issued by the Finance Latvia Association on the application of OFAC sanctions are accessible here.

The Procurement Monitoring Bureau infosheet on the application of sanctions in public procurement

Discussion "Application of the Law On International Sanctions and National Sanctions of the Republic of Latvia in organising public procurement by local authorities" (a video in Latvian)

On the application in Latvia of European Union sanctions against terrorists

Sanctions imposed:
  • a freezing of funds and other economic resources, and a prohibition on making funds and other financial resources available and on rendering financial  and other related services;

  • commitment of EU Member States to afford each other assistance in the field of police and judicial cooperation (prevention and combating of terrorist acts).

Council Common Position (with amendments) and Council Decision

Council Common Position of 27 December 2001 on the application of specific measures to combat terrorism (2001/931/CFSP) https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/?uri=CELEX%3A32001E0931

COUNCIL COMMON POSITION 2009/468/CFSP of 15 June 2009 updating Common Position 2001/931/CFSP on the application of specific measures to combat terrorism and repealing Common Position 2009/67/CFSP

https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/en/TXT/?uri=CELEX:32009E0468:32009E0468

 

Amendments:

COUNCIL DECISION (CFSP) 2015/2430 of 21 December 2015 updating the list of persons, groups and entities subject to Articles 2, 3 and 4 of Common Position 2001/931/CFSP on the application of specific measures to combat terrorism, and repealing Decision (CFSP) 2015/1334 https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/en/TXT/?uri=CELEX%3A32015D2430
COUNCIL DECISION (CFSP) 2015/2430 of 21 December 2015 updating the list of persons, groups and entities subject to Articles 2, 3 and 4 of Common Position 2001/931/CFSP on the application of specific measures to combat terrorism, and repealing Decision (CFSP) 2015/1334

https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/PDF/?uri=CELEX:32015D2430&from=EN:32015D2430&from=EN


Council Regulation (with amendments)

COUNCIL REGULATION (EC) No 2580/2001 of 27 December 2001 on specific restrictive measures directed against certain persons and entities with a view to combating terrorism, consolidated version (06.07.2013)

https://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=CONSLEG:2001R2580:20130707:EN:PDF:2001R2580:20130707:EN:PDF

 

Latest amendments

COUNCIL REGULATION (EU) 2017/2061 of 13 November 2017 amending Regulation (EC) No 2580/2001 on specific restrictive measures directed against certain persons and entities with a view to combating terrorism https://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=CELEX:32017R2061:EN:PDF:32017R2061:EN:PDF
COUNCIL IMPLEMENTING REGULATION (EU) 2017/2064 of 13 November 2017 implementing Article 2(3) of Regulation (EC) No 2580/2001 on specific restrictive measures directed against certain persons and entities with a view to combating terrorism, and amending Implementing Regulation (EU) 2017/1420 http://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/?uri=CELEX:32017R2064:32017R2064

Latest updates to the terrorist list:
COMMISSION IMPLEMENTING REGULATION (EU) 2018/50 of 11 January 2018 amending for the 280th time Council Regulation (EC) No 881/2002 imposing certain specific restrictive measures directed against certain persons and entities associated with the ISIL (Da'esh) and Al-Qaida organisations https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/en/TXT/?uri=CELEX:32018R0050:32018R0050

EU sanctions are only targeted against persons, groups, entities and companies listed in annex to COUNCIL COMMON POSITION 2009/468/CFSP of 15 June 2009 updating Common Position 2001/931/CFSP on the application of specific measures to combat terrorism and repealing Common Position 2009/67/CFSP as well as in annex to COUNCIL DECISION 2014/72/CFSP of 10 February 2014 updating and amending the list of persons, groups and entities subject to Articles 2, 3 and 4 of Common Position 2001/931/CFSP on the application of specific measures to combat terrorism, and repealing Decision 2013/395/CFSP and to Council Regulation (EC) No 2580/2001 of 27 December 2001 on specific restrictive measures directed against certain persons and entities with a view to combating terrorism (see also Amendments to Regulation).

In line with EU sanctions, financial restrictions have been established, namely, all funds and economic resources belonging to, owned, held or controlled by a listed natural or legal person, group or entity are frozen, and making available any funds and economic resources to such persons and entities is prohibited.

The said restrictions are binding within the territory of the European Union, including its airspace, and they apply to any natural and legal person falling under EU jurisdiction.

*This overview has been prepared for information purposes. All publications of the European Union legislation are available in the Official Journal of the European Union at http://eur-lex.europa.eu/JOIndex.do?ihmlang=lv.

Further information on EU restrictive measures is available on the website of the European External Action Service at http://eeas.europa.eu/cfsp/sanctions/index_en.htm.

On the application in Latvia of European Union sanctions against ISIL (Da’esh) and Al-Qaida

Sanctions imposed: Council Common Position (with amendments)
  • an embargo on export of arms and related materiel;

  • a ban on provision of certain (arms related) services;

  • freezing of funds and economic resources and prohibiting them from being made available;

  • restrictions on admission.

COUNCIL COMMON POSITION of 27 May 2002 concerning restrictive measures against members of the Al-Qaida organisation and other individuals, groups, undertakings and entities associated with them (2002/402/CFSP), consolidates version (01.08.2011)

http://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=CONSLEG:2002E0402:20110801:EN:PDF:2002E0402:20110801:EN:PDF

 

Amendments:

Council Decision (CFSP) 2016/368 of 14 March 2016 amending Common Position 2002/402/CFSP concerning restrictive measures against members of the Al-Qaida organisation and other individuals, groups, undertakings and entities associated with them

https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/?uri=CELEX:32016D0368:32016D0368

 

Council Regulations (with amendments)

COUNCIL REGULATION (EC) No 881/2002 of 27 May 2002 imposing certain specific restrictive measures directed against certain persons and entities associated with the ISIL (Da'esh) and Al-Qaida organisations, consolidated version (till 15.03.2016)

https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/HTML/?uri=CELEX:02002R0881-20160316:02002R0881-20160316

 

COUNCIL REGULATION (EU) 2016/1686 of 20 September 2016 imposing additional restrictive measures directed against ISIL (Da'esh) and Al-Qaeda and natural and legal persons, entities or bodies associated with them

https://eur-lex.europa.eu/eli/reg/2016/1686/oj?locale=en

 

Amendments:

COMMISSION IMPLEMENTING REGULATION (EU) 2016/647 of 25 April 2016 amending for the 245th time Council Regulation (EC) No 881/2002 imposing certain specific restrictive measures directed against certain persons and entities associated with the ISIL (Da'esh) and Al-Qaida organisations

https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/PDF/?uri=CELEX:32016R0647&rid=5:32016R0647&rid=5

 

EU sanctions are only targeted against persons, groups, entities and companies listed in annex to COUNCIL REGULATION (EC) No 881/2002 of 27 May 2002 imposing certain specific restrictive measures directed against certain persons and entities associated with the ISIL (Da'esh) and Al-Qaida organisations, (see also respective amendments to the Regulation).

In line with EU sanctions, the following have been established: an arms embargo (prohibiting the direct or indirect supply, sale and transfer of arms and related materiel of all types including weapons and ammunition, military vehicles and equipment, paramilitary equipment, and spare parts for the aforementioned, as well as of technical advice, assistance, or training related to military activities); restrictions on admission (measures preventing the listed persons from entering into, or transit through the territories of Member States); financial restrictions (freezing of all funds and economic resources belonging to, owned, held or controlled by the listed persons and entities, and ensuring that no funds and economic resources are made available to the said persons and entities); and a ban on provision of certain services (prohibiting the provision of technical assistance, brokering services, financing or financial assistance or other services related to the arms embargo).

The said restrictions are binding within the territory of the European Union, including its airspace, and they apply to any natural and legal person falling under EU jurisdiction.

*This overview has been prepared for information purposes. All publications of the European Union legislation are available in the Official Journal of the European Union at http://eur-lex.europa.eu/JOIndex.do?ihmlang=lv.

Further information on EU restrictive measures is available on the website of the European External Action Service at http://eeas.europa.eu/cfsp/sanctions/index_en.htm.