Foreign Minister calls on graduates of Munster Latvian Gymnasium to preserve Latvian traditions

28.06.2007. 21:57


From 28 June to 1 July 2007, a reunion of past graduates of the Munster Latvian High School (MLG) will be held in Munster, Germany. The opening address at the event will be made by Ms Daiga Krieva, Adviser and Head of the Latvian Consulate in Bonn.

The Head of the Latvian diplomatic mission will read a letter of congratulations from Foreign Minister Artis Pabriks, in which he calls on the graduates and friends of the Munster Latvian High School to continue to preserve Latvian traditions abroad. Ms Krieva will also participate in political discussions and a press conference.

The programme of the reunion includes festive, cultural, sports events and informal meetings. The exhibition MLG in Photographs and Documents will be on display at the Munster Latvian Centre. On 30 June, a Grand Ball will be held for the graduates, with musical entertainment by the group Perkons.

The original Latvian High School was established on 15 February 1946 in Detmold. Later the school was relocated to Augustdorf, and since 1957 its location was Munster. All classes and after-class events were conducted in the Latvian language. Special emphasis was placed on the history, traditions and folklore of Latvia, as well as music education and Latvian literature.

As a result of the activities of the Munster Latvian High School, Munster was the centre of the Latvian public life in Western Europe. In 1973, the school was presented with the National Award in recognition of its special achievements in the art, culture and public sectors. After the restoration of independence of the Republic of Latvia, the organizational structure and the school curriculum underwent changes. Students mainly from Latvia enrolled in the school and the graduation certificates were recognised as valid for studies at any of the European higher educational establishments.

The Munster Latvian High School was closed in 1998; however, the Munster Latvian Centre acts as its successor.

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